Web Services Distributed Management

Known as: WSDM 
Web Services Distributed Management (WSDM, pronounced wisdom) is a web service standard for managing and monitoring the status of other services. The… (More)
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Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2015
Highly Cited
2015
Social networks are commonly used for marketing purposes. For example, free samples of a product can be given to a few… (More)
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2014
2014
The vast amount of real-time and social content in microblogs results in an information overload for users when searching… (More)
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2012
2012
Active learning for ranking, which is to selectively label the most informative examples, has been widely studied in recent years… (More)
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Highly Cited
2012
Highly Cited
2012
Social recommendation, which aims to systematically leverage the social relationships between users as well as their past… (More)
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2008
2007
2007
Web services have greatly leveraged the world of Business-to-Business (B2B) communication and promise a lot more through dynamic… (More)
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2005
2005
The Web Service Modelling Execution Environment is a platform for dynamic discovery, mediation and invocation of Semantic Web… (More)
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2003
2003
Adaptive web sites are sites that automatically improve their internal organization and/or presentation by observing user… (More)
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2001
2001
INTRODUCTION Today Web-related software development seems to be faced with a crisis not unlike the one that occurred a generation… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998