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Tettigoniidae

Known as: bush-crickets, bushcrickets, long-horned grasshoppers 
 
National Institutes of Health

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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
The Anabrus simplex is a swarming plague orthopteran found in western North America. The genome is 15 766 bp in length and genome… Expand
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
  • K. Heller
  • Naturwissenschaften
  • 2005
  • Corpus ID: 26788893
Entomol. 13, 393 (1988) 9. Sugihara, G., May, R. M. : Trends Ecol. Evol. 5, 79 (1990) 10. Batschelet, E. : Circular Statistics in… Expand
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
  • B. P. Oldfield
  • Journal of comparative physiology
  • 2004
  • Corpus ID: 21577933
Summary1.Removing the anterior tympanic membrane of the tettigoniidCaedicia simplex did not significantly alter either the tuning… Expand
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
SummaryThe stridulatory sounds and movements produced by the females of various bushcricket species (Tettigonoidea… Expand
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Rivers provide important resources for riparian consumers, especially in arid or seasonally arid biomes. Pygmy grasshoppers… Expand
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Imperfect synchrony between male calls occurs widely in acoustically courting crickets and bushcrickets. Males which are able to… Expand
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Highly Cited
1993
Highly Cited
1993
1. The metabolic costs of calling for male Requena verticalis Walker (Tettigoniidae: Listroscelidinae) were measured by direct… Expand
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Highly Cited
1988
Highly Cited
1988
  • D. Gwynne
  • Evolution; international journal of organic…
  • 1988
  • Corpus ID: 32503301
Katydid males (Requena verticalis) produce spermatophores with a large sperm‐free spermatophylax, which is eaten by the female… Expand
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Highly Cited
1984
Highly Cited
1984
  • D. Gwynne
  • Evolution; international journal of organic…
  • 1984
  • Corpus ID: 27564404
Darwin (1871) suggested that differences in the intensity of sexual selection on the sexes was a cause of secondary sexual… Expand
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Highly Cited
1982
Highly Cited
1982
  • D. Gwynne
  • Animal Behaviour
  • 1982
  • Corpus ID: 53199864
Abstract Female katydids receive a large spermatophore at mating which they subsequently eat. Available evidence indicates that… Expand
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