Spectral modeling synthesis

Known as: SMS (disambiguation), Spectral modelling synthesis 
Spectral modeling synthesis or simply SMS is an acoustic modeling approach for speech and other signals. SMS considers sounds as a combination of… Expand
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2017
2017
Spectral Modelling Synthesis (SMS) is a sound synthesis technique that models time-varying spectra of given sounds as a… Expand
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2015
2015
While the technique of auralization has been in use for quite some time in architectural acoustics, the application to… Expand
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2013
2013
The modeling methods for generating musical sounds are largely categorized into two major sections: physical modeling and… Expand
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2012
2012
The LISTEN Project is collaborative project aiming to build a demonstrator software system for simulation and auralization of the… Expand
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2010
2010
†Summary Spectral modeling synthesis (SMS) is a powerful tool for musical sound modeling. This technique considers a sound as a… Expand
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2010
2010
The timbre of an instrument is usually represented by sinusoids plus noise. Spectral modeling synthesis (SMS) is an audio… Expand
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2003
2003
X. Serra. 1989. A system for sound analysis / transformation / synthesis based on a deterministic plus stochastic decomposition… Expand
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
Sinusoidal modeling has enjoyed a rich history in both speech and music applications, including sound transformations… Expand
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1998
1998
Periodic or quasi-periodic low-frequency components (i.e. vibrato and tremolo) are present in steadystate portions of sustained… Expand
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