Simalia amethistina

Known as: Python amethystinus, Liasis amethystinus, Morelia amethistina 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1999-2018
0119992018

Papers overview

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2018
2018
Research over the past decade has shown that attractant pheromones used by cerambycid beetles are often highly conserved, with… (More)
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2016
2016
The present day distribution and spatial genetic diversity of Mesoamerican biota reflects a long history of responses to habitat… (More)
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2014
2014
Among the ciliates, Stentor amethystinus stands out for its conspicuous red-violet color compared to its blue- and red-colored… (More)
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Review
2013
Review
2013
The North American species of Semanotus Mulsant, 1839 are reviewed. Semanotus ligneus (Fabricius, 1787), Semanotus amplus amplus… (More)
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2012
2012
Hummingbird abundance varies with plant bloom phenology used for feeding. However, the information on hummingbird-flower… (More)
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2009
2009
To the Editor: We initiated enhanced surveillance for human fascio-liasis after a reported increase in livestock cases in the… (More)
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2008
2008
We analyzed mitochondrial DNA sequence variation across 69 Amethyst-throated Hummingbirds (Lampornis amethystinus), comparing… (More)
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2005
2005
The Northern Central American Highlands have been recognized as endemic bird area, but little is known about bird communities in… (More)
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2004
2004
Mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) were studied in zooplankton from 13 Argentinian lakes covering a broad range in altitude… (More)
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1999
1999
  • Johanna Luybourn - Parry ’ Stephen J. Perriss
  • 1999
A large mixotrophic ciliate (-200 km long) of the genus Stentor is a common constituent of the protozooplankton of Australian… (More)
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