Schwannomatosis

Known as: Neurilemmomatosis, Neurilemmomatosis, congenital cutaneous, Neurinomatosis 
A rare genetic disorder characterized by the presence of multiple schwannomas.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2012
2012
We analyzed the histologic features of peripheral nerve sheath tumors occurring in 14 patients with schwannomatosis. Among a… (More)
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2011
2011
OBJECT The aim of this study was to provide disease-specific information about schwannomatosis in its different forms and to… (More)
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2011
2011
BACKGROUND Schwannomatosis is a disease characterized by multiple non-vestibular schwannomas. Although biallelic NF2 mutations… (More)
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2009
2009
Schwannomatosis (MIM 162091) is a condition predisposing to the development of central and peripheral schwannomas; most cases are… (More)
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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
Schwannomatosis is a third major form of neurofibromatosis that has recently been linked to mutations in the SMARCB1 (hSnf5/INI1… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Patients with schwannomatosis develop multiple schwannomas but no vestibular schwannomas diagnostic of neurofibromatosis type 2… (More)
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2006
2006
Diagnostic criteria for schwannomatosis have been proposed in a recent consensus statement. These criteria permit schwannomatosis… (More)
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Review
2005
Review
2005
The neurofibromatoses are a diverse group of genetic conditions that share a predisposition to the development of tumors of the… (More)
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2003
2003
BACKGROUND Schwannomatosis is a recently recognized disorder, defined as multiple pathologically proven schwannomas without… (More)
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Review
1996
Review
1996
Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumors that most commonly occur singularly in otherwise normal individuals. Multiple… (More)
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