SPLINT, TRACTION

Known as: splints traction, traction splint, traction splints 
A noninvasive traction component is a device, such as a head halter, pelvic belt, or a traction splint, that does not penetrate the skin and is… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1947-2016
02419472015

Papers overview

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2009
2009
Traction splints are widely used for immobilisation of fractures of the lower limb. There is brevity of evidence-based research… (More)
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2004
2004
Traction splints have been used in EMS for more than 40 years. However, they were originally designed for the treatment of… (More)
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2003
2003
OBJECTIVE To describe the use of traction splinting in children with femoral shaft fracture and to determine if timing of… (More)
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1999
1999
Two patients thought to have distal femur fractures presented to the emergency department (ED) of a level 1 trauma center with… (More)
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1998
1998
Fracture-dislocation of the middle phalanx at the proximal interphalangeal joint is a difficult problem. Open reduction and… (More)
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1998
1998
One hundred and thirty patients with 339 divided flexor tendons affecting 208 fingers were studied prospectively between 1988 and… (More)
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1990
1990
Class II, division 1 cases are treated by many different techniques depending on the age of the patient and cause of the… (More)
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1984
1984
Orthodontists are particularly interested in knowing exactly what skeletal and dental changes are produced by headgear. With… (More)
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1984
1984
A new lower extremity splint apparatus was applied by paramedics to 50 patients in the prehospital setting to manage a total of… (More)
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1981
1981
The treatment of fractures of the femoral shaft by traction may delay union and produce stiffness of the knee. The technique of… (More)
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