Rule Interchange Format

The Rule Interchange Format (RIF) is a W3C Recommendation. RIF is part of the infrastructure for the semantic web, along with (principally) SPARQL… (More)
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Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2006-2016
051020062016

Papers overview

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2012
2012
Rule interchange has become one of the most important issues in the Semantic Web. As a recommendation of the W3C (WWW Consortium… (More)
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2011
2011
The adoption of standards by the knowledge representation and logic programming communities is essential for their visibility and… (More)
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2010
2010
The Rule Interchange Format Production Rule Dialect (RIFPRD) is a W3C Recommendation to define production rules for the Semantic… (More)
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2010
2010
The W3C Rule Interchange Format (RIF) is a forthcoming standard for exchanging rules among different systems and developing… (More)
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Review
2009
Review
2009
In this survey paper we summarize the requirements for rule interchange languages for applications in the legal domain and use… (More)
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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
The Rule Interchange Format (RIF) is an activity within the World Wide Web Consortium aimed at developing a Web standard for… (More)
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2008
2008
The Rule Interchange Format (RIF) is an emerging W3C format that allows rules to be exchanged between rule systems. Uncertainty… (More)
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2008
2008
It is commonly accepted that separating the declarative rules from the procedural code of an application makes that application… (More)
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2007
2007
Rules play an increasingly important role in a variety of Semantic Web applications as well as in traditional IT systems. As a… (More)
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