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Rattlesnake Venoms

Known as: Rattlesnake Venom, Venom, Rattlesnake, Venoms, Rattlesnake 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2016
Highly Cited
2016
Measuring local adaptation can provide insights into how coevolution occurs between predators and prey. Specifically, theory… 
Review
2014
Review
2014
Snake venom toxins are responsible for causing severe pathology and toxicity following envenomation including necrosis, apoptosis… 
Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
Venom of the western diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus atrox) induces apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, which… 
Highly Cited
1988
Highly Cited
1988
Crotalus atrox venom contains a variety of proteases which render fibrinogen incoagulable and solubilize fibrin. One of these… 
Highly Cited
1984
Highly Cited
1984
Crotalus atrox venom contains agents that render human fibrinogen and plasma incoagulable by thrombin. To elucidate the mechanism… 
Highly Cited
1979
Highly Cited
1979
Although the incidence of infection secondary to the bites of venomous snakes remains unknown, the routine use of prophylactic… 
Highly Cited
1977
Highly Cited
1977
Current methods for phospholipid synthesis involving acylation of sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine, lysolecithins, and related… 
Highly Cited
1971
Highly Cited
1971
The predatory strikes of a sidewinder rattlesnake (Crotalus cerastes) can be avoided by kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami) in the… 
Highly Cited
1952
Highly Cited
1952