Pycnonotus gularis

Known as: Pycnonotus melanicterus gularis 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1957-2018
012319572017

Papers overview

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2018
2018
Invasive alien species are a major cause of biodiversity loss globally, but especially on islands where high species richness and… (More)
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Review
2017
Review
2017
Recently, debate has flourished about inadequacies in the simplistic “worst invasive species” approach and its global scale. Here… (More)
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2017
2017
Urban expansion increases fragmentation of the landscape. In effect, fragmentation decreases connectivity, causes green space… (More)
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2016
2016
The first complete maternally-inherited mitochondrial genome of Pycnonotus melanicterus has been sequenced and annotated in this… (More)
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2012
2012
Given a paucity of data on the occurrence of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in wild passerines and other small terrestrial… (More)
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Review
2010
Review
2010
  • M. Awan, SARDAR MUHAMMAD RAFIQUE, ISHTIAQ CHAUDRY
  • 2010
A study was conducted from June 2007 to May 2008 on monthly basis and the changes in bird diversity were determined after the… (More)
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2008
2008
We studied avian dispersal of seeds from the hemiparasitic mistletoe Plicosepalus acaciae (Loranthaceae) to its tree hosts Acacia… (More)
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2007
2007
In Hatay, 13 nematodes (8 [female symbol] and 5 [male symbol]) were observed in the thoracic cavity of a white-spectacled bulbul… (More)
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2004
2004
Oocysts of Isospora ernsti n. sp. and Isospora blagburni n. sp. are described from the black-capped bulbul Pycnonotus xanthopygos… (More)
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