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Pterodroma cookii

Known as: Pterodroma cooki 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2014
2014
Palaeontological studies show that three endemic procellariid seabird species became extinct on the remote island of St Helena in… Expand
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2011
2011
We estimated apparent annual survival of adult and young grey-faced petrels (Pterodroma macroptera gouldi) and age of first… Expand
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2010
2010
Past studies have indicated that Pacific rats Rattus exulans are significant predators of the chicks of surface-breeding seabirds… Expand
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2007
2007
Interpreting the levels of genetic diversity in organisms with diverse life and population histories can be difficult. The… Expand
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2006
2006
Fifty-nine seabird species (among which 28 are confirmed breeders) from 26 genera and 11 families were listed for different… Expand
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2005
2005
The Galápagos petrel (Pterodroma phaeopygia) is endemic to the Galápagos archipelago, where it is known to breed only on five… Expand
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2002
2002
Abstract The Black-winged Petrel, Pterodroma nigripennis, is a recent coloniser of Lord Howe Island, with adults present between… Expand
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2000
2000
The endemic Barau's petrel (Pterodroma baraui) is restricted to the island of La Reunion in the Mascarene archipelago where it… Expand
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1992
1992
We report the attraction of Dark-rumped Petrels (Pterodroma phaeopygia), an endangered seabird of the Galapagos Islands, to… Expand
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