Paspalum

Known as: Kodo Millet, Bahiagrasses, Millets, Kodo 
A plant genus of the family POACEAE that is used for forage.
National Institutes of Health

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2010
2010
Apomixis is defined as clonal reproduction by seed. A comparative transcriptomic analysis was undertaken between apomictic and… (More)
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2008
2008
The subgenus Anachyris of the genus Paspalum comprises six species, all native to the New World. Cytology, embryology, fertility… (More)
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2007
2007
Paspalum notatum Flügge is a warm-season forage grass with mainly diploid (2n = 20) and autotetraploid (2n = 40) representatives… (More)
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2006
2006
Apomixis in plants is a form of clonal reproduction through seeds. A BAC clone linked to apomictic reproduction in Paspalum… (More)
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2002
2002
A mapping population of Paspalum simplex segregating for apomixis (asexual reproduction through seeds) was screened with AFLPs to… (More)
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2001
2001
Apomixis is a form of asexual reproduction that in plants leads to the production of seed progeny that are exact copies of the… (More)
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Highly Cited
1996
Highly Cited
1996
Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), also known as microsatellites, are highly variable DNA sequences that can be used as markers for… (More)
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1983
1983
Paspalum scrobiculatum is widely distributed in damp habitats across the Old World tropics. It is harvested as a wild cereal in… (More)
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Highly Cited
1964
Highly Cited
1964
Carbohydrates are the primiiary source of reserve energy stored in the vegetative organs of biennial and perennial forage plants… (More)
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