Marmota

Known as: woodchuck, Marmotas, Marmots 
A genus of Sciuridae consisting of 14 species. They are shortlegged, burrowing rodents which hibernate in winter.
National Institutes of Health

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Highly Cited
2014
Highly Cited
2014
Ole Petter Ottersen, Jashodhara Dasgupta, Chantal Blouin, Paulo Buss, Virasakdi Chongsuvivatwong, Julio Frenk, Sakiko Fukuda-Parr… (More)
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2005
2005
The relationship between individual genetic diversity and fitness-related traits are poorly understood in the wild. The… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
STUDY OBJECTIVES To investigate the association between job strain and components of the job strain model and coronary heart… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
STUDY OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of chronic job insecurity and changes in job security on self reported health, minor… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
STUDY OBJECTIVE To examine associations between measures of work stress (that is, the combination of high effort and low reward… (More)
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1998
1998
Yellow-bellied marmots Marmota ̄aviventris in the East River Valley of Colorado were live-trapped and individually marked… (More)
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Highly Cited
1988
Highly Cited
1988
Body temperature (T b) of socially hibernating alpine marmots, a pair and two family groups, was monitored continuously from… (More)
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Highly Cited
1983
Highly Cited
1983
Female mammals experience a very high and often unappreciated rate of reproductive failure. Among human pregnancies alone, over… (More)
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