Mantophasmatodea

Known as: gladiators, mantos 
 

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2002-2016
02420022016

Papers overview

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2012
2012
The insect order Mantophasmatodea was described in 2002. Prior to that time, several generations of entomologists had assumed… (More)
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2012
2012
Vibrational communication for species identification and mate location is widespread among insects. We investigated the… (More)
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2009
2009
All species of the insect order Mantophasmatodea characteristically keep the 5th tarsomere and pretarsus (arolium plus two claws… (More)
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2009
2009
The postembryonic antennal development and life cycle of a member of the insect order Mantophasmatodea (Lobatophasma… (More)
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2008
2008
The Mantophasmatodea is the most recently discovered insect order. The fossil records of all other ‘polyneopteran’ orders extend… (More)
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2008
2008
The communication via percussion of the abdomen on the substrate for species recognition and mate location of males and females… (More)
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2008
2008
We examined the phylogeny of Mantophasmatodea from southern Africa (South Africa, Namibia) using approx. 1300 bp of mitochondrial… (More)
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2006
2006
This study presents the first physiological information for a member of the wingless Mantophasmatodea, or Heelwalkers. This… (More)
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2002
2002
A new insect order, Mantophasmatodea, is described on the basis of museum specimens of a new genus with two species: Mantophasma… (More)
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2002
2002
Klass et al. (1) linked the extinct fossil taxon Raptophasma to newly described species of an extant taxon Mantophasma… (More)
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