Maackia amurensis leukoagglutinin

 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1994-2015
012319942015

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2015
2015
BACKGROUND Maackia amurensis leukoagglutinin (MAL) is a glycoprotein and sialic acid-binding lectin that is used widely in the… (More)
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2015
2015
The recent discovery that human noroviruses (huNoVs) recognize sialic acids (SAs) in addition to histo-blood group antigens… (More)
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2012
2012
Aberrant sialylation and altered sialyltransferase (ST) expressions are frequently found in many types of cancer. In this study… (More)
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2009
2009
BACKGROUND Sialic acid, as a terminal saccharide residue on cell surface glycoconjugates, plays an important role in a variety of… (More)
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2008
2008
Aberrant expression of sialoglycoconjugates has been thought to play an important role in cancer progression. Our previous lectin… (More)
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2007
2007
BACKGROUND/AIMS Aberrant cell surface glycosylation, and especially excessive sialylation, is thought to have great importance in… (More)
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2007
2007
PURPOSE Antigen-sampling M cells have been identified in conjunctival tissue overlying lymphoid follicles in rabbits and guinea… (More)
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2006
2006
Cancer of the thyroid gland is one of the most common endocrine diseases. Histological evaluation is often complicated by… (More)
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2003
2003
AIMS To investigate the relationship between sialylation of glycoconjugates and clinicopathological characteristics of gastric… (More)
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1996
1996
Assays have been developed for the isoforms of erythropoietin (EPO) based on their binding to eight different lectins. These… (More)
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