Lingula of left lung

Known as: Lingula of the Lung, lingula, Lingula pulmonis sinistri 
A small tongue-like projection from the lower portion of the upper lobe of the left lung.
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1938-2017
051019382016

Papers overview

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2013
2013
The precise anatomic location of the lingula is clinically significant because it is subject to injury during a variety of oral… (More)
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2009
2009
This study aims to investigate the shape, height, and location of the lingula in relation to surrounding structures for sagittal… (More)
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2007
2007
To evaluate the incidence of lingula shapes in Thai adult mandibles and to compare the accuracy of panoramic radiograph… (More)
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2006
2006
BACKGROUND Bronchiectasis is not considered to be uncommon in children anymore. The relationship between pulmonary function and… (More)
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2004
2004
OBJECTIVE Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the leading cause of death in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Although early… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
We compared high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with chest radiography (CR) to determine if there is any advantage to… (More)
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1996
1996
BACKGROUND In a series of 229 patients infected with mycobacterial organisms, we noted a specific female phenotype that involves… (More)
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1993
1993
To aid in the diagnosis of lung diseases associated with airway obstruction and air-trapping, we use dynamic ultrafast high… (More)
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1993
1993
Asbestos-related lung diseases tend to have distinct local distributions, for example, asbestosis first appears and tends to be… (More)
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