Leeches

Known as: Hirudinea, ??, Hirudineas 
Annelids of the class Hirudinea. Some species, the bloodsuckers, may become temporarily parasitic upon animals, including man. Medicinal leeches… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2011
2011
After a short introduction to the classification of medicinal leeches, their historical use in phlebotomy (blood-letting) and… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
The European medicinal leech is one of vanishingly few animal species with direct application in modern medicine. In addition to… (More)
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2007
2007
Leeches (Hirudinea) constitute a relatively small monophyletic group of highly specialized annelids, but may play important roles… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
In the field, a multitude of species can be exposed to numerous toxicants; thus, the sensitivity of individual species to… (More)
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2004
2004
s 69: 458 – 459. Bird, N.T. (1968). Effects of mating on subsequent development of a parasitic copepod. Journal of Parasitology… (More)
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2002
2002
Intracellular rickettsia-like structures were found in the tissues of a glossiphoniid leech, Torix tagoi, by transmission… (More)
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1999
1999
Aeromonas hydrophila infections are a recognized complication of the use of medicinal leeches. The authors performed an… (More)
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Review
1996
Review
1996
Leeching is considered by many to be a discredited medical relic of the past. This view is not justified, since leeches still… (More)
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Review
1995
Review
1995
Leech swimming is produced by the antiphasic contractions of dorsal and ventral longitudinal muscles that travel rearward along… (More)
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1978
1978
Leeches swim by undulating their extended and flattened body in the dorsoventral direction, to form a wave that travels backwards… (More)
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