Kinetic data structure

A kinetic data structure is a data structure used to track an attribute of a geometric system that is moving continuously.For example, a kinetic… (More)
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Highly Cited
2016
Highly Cited
2016
Traditional salient object detection models often use hand-crafted features to formulate contrast and various prior knowledge… (More)
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Highly Cited
2012
Highly Cited
2012
Searchable symmetric encryption (SSE) allows a client to encrypt its data in such a way that this data can still be searched. The… (More)
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2004
2004
Modeling the physical world in the computer raises problems that intertwine discrete and continuous aspects For example physical… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
We present kinetic data structures for detecting collisions between a set of polygons that are not only moving continuously but… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
We describe a method for automatically building statistical shape models from a training set of example boundaries/surfaces… (More)
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2001
2001
We introduce the framework of soft kinetic data structures (SKDS). A soft kinetic data structure is an approximate data structure… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
Suppose we are simulating a collection of continu ously moving bodies rigid or deformable whose in stantaneous motion follows… (More)
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1997
1997
In many applications of computational geometry to modeling objects and processes in the physical world, the participating objects… (More)
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Highly Cited
1992
Highly Cited
1992
Hypertext users often suffer from the “lost in hyperspace” problem: disorientation from too many jumps while traversing a complex… (More)
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