HMGB4 gene

Known as: HMGB4, HIGH MOBILITY GROUP PROTEIN B4, HIGH MOBILITY GROUP BOX 4 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2002-2017
0120022017

Papers overview

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2017
2017
Cisplatin is the most commonly used anticancer drug for the treatment of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). The… (More)
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2016
2016
HMGB4 is a new member in the family of HMGB proteins that has been characterized in sperm cells, but little is known about its… (More)
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2012
2012
Proteins in the HMG family are important transcription factors. They recognize cisplatin-damaged DNA lesions with a structure… (More)
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2010
2010
High mobility group (HMG) proteins of the HMGB family are chromatin-associated proteins that as architectural factors are… (More)
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Review
2010
Review
2010
HMGB proteins are members of the High Mobility Group (HMG) superfamily, possessing a unique DNA-binding domain, the HMG-box… (More)
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2009
2009
We identified HMGB4, a novel member of the HMGB family lacking the acidic tail typically found in this family. HMGB4 is strongly… (More)
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2007
2007
High mobility group B (HMGB) proteins found in the nuclei of higher eukaryotes play roles in various cellular processes such as… (More)
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2004
2004
Chromatin-associated high mobility group (HMG) proteins of the HMGB family are versatile architectural factors assisting various… (More)
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2003
2003
In plants, a variety of chromatin-associated high mobility group (HMG) proteins belonging to the HMGB family have been identified… (More)
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2002
2002
The high mobility group (HMG) proteins of the HMGB family are architectural factors in eukaryotic chromatin, which are involved… (More)
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