Gorilla <genus>

Known as: Gorilla 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1944-2017
0102019442016

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
Descriptions of novel tool use by great apes in response to different circumstances aids us in understanding the factors favoring… (More)
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2004
2004
The objective of this paper is to collate information on western gorilla diet from six study sites throughout much of their… (More)
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2004
2004
We examined the influence of ecological (diet, swamp use, and rainfall) and social (intergroup interaction rate) factors on… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
This paper presents data on the dispersal patterns and reproductive success of western lowland gorilla females from a long-term… (More)
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2001
2001
The manipulative actions of mountain gorillas Gorilla g. beringei were examined in the context of foraging on hard-to-process… (More)
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2001
2001
Although field studies have suggested the existence of cultural transmission of foraging techniques in primates, identification… (More)
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1998
1998
By studying western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla, n = 8) in zoological gardens via ethological and non-invasive… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
The African apes are a group of closely related taxa that differ considerably in body size. In spite of the large body size… (More)
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Highly Cited
1991
Highly Cited
1991
Manual dexterity of 44 wild gorillas of all ages and both sexes was investigated on six naturally acquired feeding tasks of… (More)
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Highly Cited
1978
Highly Cited
1978
In many primate species, more males than females leave their natal group and transfer to another. In man, chimpanzee and the… (More)
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