Folliculitis

Known as: Folliculitides, Folliculitis NOS, inflammation of hair follicles 
Inflammation of the hair follicles. Causes include excessive perspiration, skin infections, and skin wounds.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
OBJECTIVE To determine the incidence, clinical manifestations, risk factors and outcome of immune reconstitution inflammatory… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
PURPOSE To investigate the tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity of the oral, selective epidermal growth factor… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
Topical aminolevulinic acid is converted into a potent photosensitizer, protoporphyrin, in human hair follicles and sebaceous… (More)
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1999
1999
In a series of 18 patients with folliculitis decalvans attending the Oxford hair clinic, eight were found to have areas of tufted… (More)
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1996
1996
Examination of 388 follicles in 24 large resections of skin for the presence of histologic folliculitis and Demodex mites… (More)
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1986
1986
Eosinophilic pustular folliculitis was first described by Ofuji et al in 1970. It is characterized by pruritic circinate plaques… (More)
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1986
1986
A 49-year-old man presented with an acute onset of folliculitis on his right cheek. The folliculitis was unresponsive to… (More)
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1984
1984
Five infants under 1 year of age were reported with a syndrome of recurrent crops of pruritic papulopustules of the scalp. In… (More)
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1982
1982
Good to excellent clinical results have been obtained in the treatment of severe inflammatory acne (acne conglobata, acne… (More)
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1975
1975
Disseminated inflammatory lesions constituting a multifocal granulomatous folliculitis in the thyroid are described. These… (More)
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