EDTA Clearance

Known as: EDTACLR 
A measurement of the volume of serum or plasma that would be cleared of Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) through its excretion for a specified… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1976-2013
02419762013

Papers overview

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2013
2013
Evaluation of glomerular function is a useful part of the diagnostic approach in animals suspected of having renal disease. Time… (More)
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1999
1999
The aim of this study was to determine whether absolute 24 h DMSA uptake measurements (%DMSA) correlate well with 51Cr-EDTA… (More)
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1996
1996
PURPOSE To determine a valid and practical routine for glomerular filtration rate measurement in gynaecologic cancer patients… (More)
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1996
1996
The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of pregnant rats is generally believed to exceed non-pregnant values. This notion is… (More)
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1990
1990
The nonionic iodinated contrast medium, iohexol, introduced for clinical urography, is eliminated from the human organism mainly… (More)
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1987
1987
Blood samples were taken from 21 subjects at 2 to 4 hours after simultaneous injection of contrast medium (metrizoate) for… (More)
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1987
1987
In twenty-six patients injected with metrizoate during urography, plasma was analyzed for iodine concentration using x-ray… (More)
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1984
1984
51Cr-EDTA clearance was determined in 50 children from the activity in one plasma sample by means of two methods. The calculation… (More)
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Highly Cited
1981
Highly Cited
1981
Reference values for glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were defined using eight reports including epidemiological studies and… (More)
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1981
1981
51Cr-EDTA clearance was measured in 99 consecutive patients. Based on the individual plasma activity at 180, 200, 220, and 240… (More)
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