Doxastic logic

Known as: Doxastic, Reasonable belief 
Doxastic logic is a type of logic concerned with reasoning about beliefs. The term doxastic derives from the ancient Greek δόξα, doxa, which means… (More)
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Papers overview

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2016
2016
Modelling, reasoning and verifying complex situations involving a system of agents is crucial in all phases of the development of… (More)
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2008
2008
We present a logic of conditional doxastic actions, obtained by incorporating ideas from belief revision theory into the usual… (More)
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2008
2008
We prove completeness and decidability results for a family of combinations of propositional dynamic logic and unimodal doxastic… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
In this paper, we present a semantical approach to multi-agent belief revision and belief update. For this, we introduce… (More)
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2006
2006
We investigate the research programme of dynamic doxastic logic (DDL) and analyze its underlying methodology. The Ramsey test for… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
In ‘belief revision’ a theory $${\cal K}$$ is revised with a formula φ resulting in a revised theory $${\cal K}\ast\varphi… (More)
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2002
2002
We prove completeness and decidability results for a family of combinations of propositional dynamic logic and unimodal doxastic… (More)
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1999
1999
Knowledge is in ux. To a very large extent, we all owe a better understanding of what this may mean to Peter Gardenfors. But not… (More)
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1996
1996
The modal logic KD45 is frequently presented as the standard account of the logic of belief for a single agent, where perhaps… (More)
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1995
1995
In 1985 Alchourron, Gardenfors and Makinson presented their now classic theory (AGM) of theory change (belief revision). In 1988… (More)
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