Controlled natural language

Known as: CNL, Controlled language, Simplified languages 
Controlled natural languages (CNLs) are subsets of natural languages that are obtained by restricting the grammar and vocabulary in order to reduce… (More)
Wikipedia

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Review
2014
Review
2014
This paper presents an overview of ‘Lexpresso’, a Controlled Natural Language developed at the Defence Science & Technology… (More)
Is this relevant?
2009
2009
The "Semantics of Business Vocabulary and Business Ru les" (SBVR 1.0) is one of the initial specifications in the OM G's family… (More)
Is this relevant?
2009
2009
Clinicians could benefit from decision support systems incorporating the knowledge contained in clinical practice guidelines… (More)
  • figure 1
  • table 1
  • figure 2
Is this relevant?
2009
2009
Logic-based controlled natural languages (CNL) an d computational semantics in general do not address word sense disa mbiguation… (More)
Is this relevant?
2007
2007
Expressing rules in controlled natural language can bring us closer to the vision of the Semantic Web since rules can be written… (More)
  • figure 1
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
PENG is a computer-processable controlled natural language designed for writing unambiguous and precise specifications. PENG… (More)
Is this relevant?
2000
2000
Recent years have shown a surge in interest in temporal database systems, which allow users to store time-dependent information… (More)
Is this relevant?
1999
1999
Many domain specialists are not familiar or comfortable with formal notations and formal tools like theorem provers or model… (More)
Is this relevant?
1995
1995
Writing specifications for computer programs is not easy since one has to take into account the disparate conceptual worlds of… (More)
Is this relevant?
1994
1994
Writing specifications for computer programs is not easy since one has to take into account the disparate conceptual worlds of… (More)
Is this relevant?