Contingent Negative Variation

Known as: Contingent Negative Variations, Variation, Contingent Negative, Variations, Contingent Negative 
A negative shift of the cortical electrical potentials that increases over time. It is associated with an anticipated response to an expected… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
The relation between the contingent negative variation (CNV) and time estimation is evaluated in terms of temporal accumulation… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
The contingent negative variation (CNV) is a long-latency electroencephalography (EEG) surface negative potential with cognitive… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Long-term meditating subjects report that transcendental experiences (TE), which first occurred during their Transcendental… (More)
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2000
2000
Reliability parameters of a test indicate the stability (and quality) of the test itself. Reliability coefficients greater than 0… (More)
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1993
1993
Adult migraineurs without aura have an increased amplitude of the Contingent Negative Variation (CNV) between attacks. Given the… (More)
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1990
1990
The Contingent Negative Variation (CNV) is an event-related slow potential. It was recorded in healthy volunteers (n = 8) and in… (More)
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1989
1989
There have been persistent claims that the contingent negative variation (CNV) is absent or greatly attenuated in psychopaths… (More)
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Highly Cited
1986
Highly Cited
1986
Contingent negative variation (CNV), an event-related slow cerebral potential, was analyzed in 79 consecutive headache patients… (More)
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Highly Cited
1976
Highly Cited
1976
In a contingent negative variation paradigm with two stimuli paired at an interstimulus interval of 4 seconds, two distinct… (More)
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Review
1972