Concurrence

In quantum information science, the concurrence is a state invariant involving qubits.
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Topic mentions per year

1945-2018
05010019452017

Papers overview

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2008
2008
Let H(d) be the space of complex hermitian matrices of size d×d and let H+(d) ⊂ H(d) be the cone of positive semidefinite… (More)
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2008
2008
The two-qubit canonical decomposition SU(4) = [SU(2)⊗ SU(2)]∆[SU(2)⊗ SU(2)] writes any two-qubit quantum computation as a… (More)
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Review
2006
Review
2006
We review the entanglement properties in collective models and their relationship with quantum phase transitions. Focusing on the… (More)
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2005
2005
We consider the maximum bipartite entanglement that can be distilled from a single copy of a multipartite mixed entangled state… (More)
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2004
2004
We study the ordering of two-qubit states with respect to the degree of bipartite entanglement using the Wootters concurrence—a… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Differences in the supply of housing generate substantial variation in housing prices across the United States. Because housing… (More)
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2003
2003
Entanglement plays central role in quantum information theory [1]. Pure state entanglement of bipartite systems is well… (More)
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Tremendous differences in producer productivity levels exist, even within narrowly defined industries. This paper explores the… (More)
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2001
2001
Wootters [Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 2245 (1998)] has given an explicit formula for the entanglement of formation of two qubits in… (More)
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Review
2001
Review
2001
In both classical mechanics and quantum mechanics, one can de ne a pure state to be a state that is as completely speci ed as the… (More)
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