Charging argument

In computer science, a charging argument is used to compare the output of an optimization algorithm to an optimal solution. It is typically used to… (More)
Wikipedia

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2000-2016
012320002016

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2016
2016
We consider the Traveling Salesman Problem with Neighborhoods (TSPN) in doubling metrics. The goal is to find the shortest tour… (More)
Is this relevant?
2016
2016
We consider the problem of approximating a maximum weighted matching, when the edges of an underlying weighted graph G(V, E) are… (More)
  • table 1
  • figure 1
  • table 2
  • figure 2
Is this relevant?
2016
2016
A central question in algorithmic game theory is to measure the inefficiency (ratio of costs) of Nash equilibria (NE) with… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?
2014
2014
In the online Steiner tree problem, the input is a set of vertices that appear one-by-one, and we have to maintain a Steiner tree… (More)
Is this relevant?
2014
2014
We consider the Traveling Salesman Problem with Neighborhoods (TSPN) in doubling metrics. The goal is to find a shortest tour… (More)
Is this relevant?
2008
2008
Two common approaches to model uncertainty in optimization problems are to either explicitly enumerate all the realizations of… (More)
  • table 1
  • figure 1
Is this relevant?
2002
2002
In this paper, we consider hot-potato packet routing of one-to-one routing patterns on n-node trees. By applying a ‘charging… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
2000
2000
In this paper we consider hot-potato packet routing on trees. As a lower bound, for all sufficiently large n we construct a… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
Is this relevant?