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COCH gene

Known as: COCH, COCH-5B2, COCH5B2 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Review
2009
Review
2009
Hearing impairment is the most common sensory disorder, present in 1 of every 500 newborns. With 46 genes implicated in… Expand
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
Autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss (ASNHL) is the most common cause of sudden hearing loss in adults. Although autoimmune… Expand
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
The etiology of primary open angle glaucoma, a leading cause of age-related blindness, remains poorly defined, although elevated… Expand
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2005
2005
Cochlin deposits were observed in the trabecular meshwork (TM) of 8-month-old glaucomatous DBA/2J mice, coincident with the… Expand
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Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
The COCH gene is the only gene identified in man that causes autosomal dominantly inherited hearing loss associated with… Expand
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
Missense mutations in the COCH gene, which is expressed preferentially at high levels in the inner ear, cause the autosomal… Expand
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Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
In order to better understand the cause of hereditary hearing impairment, we have performed a proteomic analysis of the inner ear… Expand
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
We report the genetic analysis of one large Belgian and two small Dutch families with autosomal dominant non-syndromic… Expand
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
We analysed a Dutch family with autosomal dominant non-syndromic progressive sensorineural hearing loss and mapped the underlying… Expand
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
DFNA9 is an autosomal dominant, nonsyndromic, progressive sensorineural hearing loss with vestibular pathology. Here we report… Expand
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