Blackwell channel

The Blackwell channel is a deterministic broadcast channel model used in coding theory and information theory. It was first proposed by mathematician… (More)
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1981-2015
01219812015

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2016
2016
In this letter, we introduce a class of discrete memoryless broadcast channels, called noisy Blackwell channels, which generalize… (More)
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2015
2015
The broadcast channel (BC) with one confidential message and where the decoders cooperate via a one-sided link is considered. A… (More)
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2012
2012
A write-once memory (WOM) is a storage device that consists of cells that can take on <formula formulatype="inline"><tex Notation… (More)
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2010
2010
A Write Once Memory (WOM) is a storage medium with binary memory elements, called cells, that can change from the zero state to… (More)
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Review
2007
Review
2007
A key idea in coding for the broadcast channel (BC) is binning, in which the transmitter encode information by selecting a… (More)
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Review
2005
Review
2005
Practical implementation of random binning is one of the key challenges in achieving the largest available rate regions for many… (More)
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Highly Cited
1981
Highly Cited
1981
A simple proof using random partitions and typicality is given for Marton’s coding theorem for broadcast channels. In [l] Marton… (More)
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1981
1981
A simple proof using random partitions and typicality is<lb>given for Marton’s coding theorem for broadcast channels. In [l… (More)
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