Albuneidae

 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2010
2010
Specimens representing 12 species of albuneid sand crabs (Albuneidae) are identified and discussed, and new taxonomic information… Expand
Is this relevant?
2002
2002
A recently collected new member of the Albuneidae from the type Maastrichtian of the Netherlands extends the range of the family… Expand
  • figure 1
Is this relevant?
1999
1999
Based primarily on samples collected during French expeditions to New Caledonia and nearby regions, two new species of the sand… Expand
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
1997
1997
Sand crabs (Decapoda, Anomura, Hippoidea) are highly specialised for digging into sand using their thoracic legs. Using video… Expand
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
1997
1997
Abstract Rhythmic leg movements and tailflipping are mutually exclusive behaviours in most decapod crustaceans, but sand crabs… Expand
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
1994
1994
Primary sensory neurons that are motoneuron-like in morphology and often nonspiking (transmit afferent signals as graded… Expand
Is this relevant?
1986
1986
ABSTRACT Anomuran decapods in the family Aeglidae are ecologically and morphologically distinct from other members of the… Expand
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
1982
1982
The albuneid mole crab, Zygopu michuelis Holthuis, 1960, which was originally described from Curago and recently reported from… Expand
  • figure 1
Is this relevant?
1970
1970
[Wahrend der Larvalentwicklung der Sandkrabbe Lepidopa myops Stimpson treten vier Zoea-Stadien und ein Megalopa-Stadium auf. Die… Expand
Is this relevant?
1968
1968
Summary Austrolepidopa, gen. nov., and Stemonopa, gen. nov., are described. Austro­ lepidopa contains two species: A. schmitti… Expand
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?