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Acrolepiopsis assectella

Known as: Acrolepia assectella, leek moth 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2009
2009
Abstract Leek moth, Acrolepiopsis assectella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Acrolepiidae), is an invasive alien species in eastern Canada… Expand
2006
2006
RésuméLe comportement de quête des femelles deDiadromus pulchellus Wesmael ou comportement locomoteur impliqué dans la recherche… Expand
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2006
2006
The study of various behavioural criteria of femaleDiadromus pulchellus parasitoids in the presence of theirAcrolepiopsis… Expand
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2005
2005
Incorporation of certain phytoecdysones (ecdysterone, polypodine B, and ponasterone A) into a semisynthetic artificial diet… Expand
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2005
2005
When crushed, the leek,Allium porrum emits propyl propanethiosulfinate. The unstable thiosulfinate decomposes during GC analysis… Expand
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2004
2004
In the leek moth, Acrolepiopsis assectella, the male, stimulated by a calling female, produces a sexual pheromone that is active… Expand
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2002
2002
DpAV-4 is a symbiotic ascovirus found in natural populations of the solitary endoparasitoid wasp Diadromus pulchellus. The female… Expand
1999
1999
In braconid species, teratocytes are derived from a serosal cell membrane which envelops the developing parasitoid embryo. On… Expand
Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
The Diadromus pulchellus ascovirus (DpAV) has been isolated from laboratory strains of Diadromus pulchellus and in natural wild… Expand
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