[Pasteurella] aerogenes

Known as: Pasteurella aerogenes 
A species of facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative, rod shaped bacteria in the phylum Proteobacteria. This species is nonmotile, catalase, oxidase… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1974-2018
02419742018

Papers overview

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2004
2004
The ompX gene of Enterobacter aerogenes was cloned. Its overexpression induced a decrease in the major porin Omp36 production and… (More)
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2001
2001
Tetracycline-resistant Pasteurella aerogenes isolates obtained from the intestinal tract of swine were investigated for their tet… (More)
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2000
2000
Pasteurella aerogenes is known as a commensal bacterium or as an opportunistic pathogen, as well as a primary pathogen found to… (More)
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2000
2000
Molecular analysis of Pasteurella isolates of animal origin for plasmid-encoded tetracycline resistance genes identified a common… (More)
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1996
1996
Pasteurella aerogenes is rarely isolated from human specimens. The species is found in the digestive tract of pigs. From 1976 to… (More)
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1992
1992
Virtually complete 16S rRNA sequences were determined for 54 representative strains of species in the family Pasteurellaceae. Of… (More)
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1991
1991
Three strains of the Pasteurella aerogenes complex were isolated as sole pathogens from aborted fetuses of a sow aborted at the… (More)
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1984
1984
Progressively increasing the input concentration of growth-limiting nutrient (glucose, ammonia, K+) to anaerobic chemostat… (More)
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1979
1979
The rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus is capable of collecting and ingesting cells or short chains of a laboratory-grown bacterium… (More)
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