pectin binding

Interacting selectively and non-covalently with pectin. [GOC:mengo_curators, GOC:tt]
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1999-2017
01219992017

Papers overview

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Review
2017
Review
2017
Pectins are plant cell wall polysaccharides that can be acetylated on C2 and/or C3 of galacturonic acid residues. The degree of… (More)
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2016
2016
Although several approaches have been used to evaluate binding of carbohydrates to lectins, results are not always comparable… (More)
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2015
2015
The Wall Associated Kinases (WAKs) bind to both cross-linked polymers of pectin in the plant cell wall, but have a higher… (More)
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2012
2012
The plant cell wall is composed of a matrix of cellulose fibers, flexible pectin polymers, and an array of assorted carbohydrates… (More)
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2009
2009
The interaction between nickel and pectin extracted from citrus fruit was studied in 0.10 M KNO(3), at pH 5.5 and 25 degrees C… (More)
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2008
2008
The use of polysaccharides as DNA carriers has high potential for gene therapy applications. Pectin is a structural plant… (More)
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Review
2008
Review
2008
SUMMARY Pectin is a structural polysaccharide that is integral for the stability of plant cell walls. During soft rot infection… (More)
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1999
1999
Evaluation of adsorption performance of several industrially manufactured pectins towards some toxic heavy metals was carried out… (More)
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1999
1999
An N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)/N-acetylneuraminic acid-specific lectin from the fruiting body of Psathyrella velutina (PVL) is a… (More)
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