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haloprogin

Known as: haloprogin [Chemical/Ingredient], Haloproginum, Haloprogine 
An antifungal agent used as a topical cream. It was discontinued in favor of newer antifungals with fewer side effects.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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1997
1997
The synthesis and microbiological activity of a new series of 5(or 6)-methyl-2-substituted benzoxazoles (IVa-n) and… Expand
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1979
1979
Summary A clinical double-blind trial of topical haloprogin ointment and miconazole cream was carried out against superficial… Expand
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1977
1977
A study to compare the efficacy of clotrimazole 1% solution with that of haloprogin 1% solution for the treatment of tinea cruris… Expand
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Review
1976
Review
1976
Twenty-five years ago many of the topical remedies for superficial mycoses were irritating, toxic, or allergenic. Total x-ray… Expand
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1974
1974
The relative antifungal properties of haloprogin, a new synthetic antimicrobial agent, and two polyene antibiotics, amphotericin… Expand
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Highly Cited
1972
Highly Cited
1972
A comparative study was undertaken in rats, rabbits, miniature swine and man, in which the percutaneous absorption of the… Expand
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1972
1972
One percent haloprogin cream, a topical agent for the treatment of dermatophytoses, has proved efficacious in experimentally… Expand
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1972
1972
Haloprogin is a new topical antifungal medication. A double-blind study revealed that haloprogin is an effective preparation… Expand
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1972
1972
Abstract The acute systemic toxicity of haloprogin, 2,4,5-trichlorophenyl-γ-iodopropargyl ether, was examined in mice, rats, dogs… Expand
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1970
1970
Haloprogin was shown to be a highly effective agent for the treatment of experimentally induced topical mycotic infections in… Expand
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