entry into host

Known as: host invasion, invasion into host, invasion of host 
Penetration by an organism into the body, tissues, or cells of the host organism. The host is defined as the larger of the organisms involved in a… (More)
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
Effector proteins secreted by oomycete and fungal pathogens have been inferred to enter host cells, where they interact with host… (More)
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Review
2008
Review
2008
Our understanding of prokaryote–eukaryote symbioses as a source of evolutionary innovation has been rapidly increased by the… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is well established to enter cells by pH-dependent endocytosis, but mechanistic aspects of its… (More)
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Plants are constantly exposed to attack by an array of diverse pathogens but lack a somatically adaptive immune system. In spite… (More)
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Review
2003
Review
2003
Macrophages and dendritic cells are in the front line of host defense. When they sense host invasion, they produce cytokines that… (More)
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Simian virus 40 (SV40) utilizes endocytosis through caveolae for infectious entry into host cells. We found that after binding to… (More)
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Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
During entry, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) releases its capsid and the tegument proteins into the cytosol of a host cell… (More)
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Highly Cited
1999
Highly Cited
1999
Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that actively invades a wide variety of vertebrate cells, although the… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope binds CD4 and a chemokine receptor in sequence, releasing hydrophobic viral gp41… (More)
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Review
1997
Review
1997
Bacterial pathogens employ a number of genetic strategies to cause infection and, occasionally, disease in their hosts. Many of… (More)
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