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endosymbiont of Rhinocyllus conicus

Known as: Rhinocyllus conicus endosymbiont 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2014
2014
Herbivores may significantly reduce plant populations by reducing seed set; however, we know little of their impact on seed… Expand
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Highly Cited
2004
Highly Cited
2004
Landscape change has great, yet infrequently measured, potential to influence the susceptibility of natural systems to invasive… Expand
Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
This is the author's version of the article. The final publication is available at the publisher's website. DOI: 10.1046/j.1523… Expand
Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Rhinocyllus conicus, a weevil introduced for biological control of exotic weeds, has had major nontarget ecological effects on… Expand
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
Abstract Biological control is proposed as an ecological strategy to manage the threat of invasive plants, especially in natural… Expand
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
The insect Rhinocyllus conicus Froehlich is a flowerhead weevil deliberately intro­ duced into the United States for the… Expand
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1976
1976
A weevil [Rhinocyllus conicus (Froelich)] I host specific to Carduus, Cirsium, Silybum, and Onopordum, was introduced into… Expand