carcinoma of buccal mucosa

Known as: SCC of the Buccal Mucosa, Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Buccal Mucosa, Buccal Mucosa Squamous Cell Carcinoma 
A squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity that arises from the buccal mucosa.
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1960-2017
051019602017

Papers overview

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2016
2016
AIM To identify and characterize cancer stem cells (CSC) in moderately differentiated buccal mucosa squamous cell carcinoma… (More)
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2009
2009
The buccal mucosa is the site at highest risk of contracting malignancy in habitual betel-quid chewers who expose the buccal… (More)
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2009
2009
While stage and grade of oral cancer have a profound and well-recognised influence on outcome, the effect of site is less clear… (More)
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2006
2006
BACKGROUND In our clinical practice, we have observed a high incidence of locoregional failure in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC… (More)
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2006
2006
Tumour classification and thickness were significantly related to survival. 
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2005
2005
BACKGROUND Squamous cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa is an oral cancer reported as having a poor prognosis. In many patients… (More)
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1999
1999
The purpose of this study was to establish treatment criteria for patients with early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the buccal… (More)
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1998
1998
Background: The efficacy of postoperative radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa was evaluated. Methods… (More)
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1989
1989
Of the 49 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa referred to the Rotterdam Radio-Therapeutic Institute (RRTI… (More)
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1987
1987
Although the TNM system is the accepted standard for head and neck tumor classification, there are often discrepancies between… (More)
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