Zero-day (computing)

Known as: Zero day vulnerability, Zero day virus, Zero-Day Exploit 
A zero-day (also known as zero-hour or 0-day or day zero) vulnerability is an undisclosed computer-software vulnerability that hackers can exploit to… (More)
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Papers overview

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2016
2016
Zero-day attacks continue to challenge the enterprise network security defense. A zero-day attack path is formed when a multi… (More)
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Highly Cited
2014
Highly Cited
2014
By enabling a direct comparison of different security solutions with respect to their relative effectiveness, a network security… (More)
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2014
2014
The interest in diversity as a security mechanism has recently been revived in various applications, such as Moving Target… (More)
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Highly Cited
2012
Highly Cited
2012
Little is known about the duration and prevalence of zero-day attacks, which exploit vulnerabilities that have not been disclosed… (More)
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2011
2011
Zero-day or unknown malware are created using code obfuscation techniques that can modify the parent code to produce offspring… (More)
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2010
2010
The security risk of a network against unknown zero day attacks has been considered as something unmeasurable since software… (More)
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Highly Cited
2010
Highly Cited
2010
Phishing attacks continue to plague users as attackers develop new ways to fool users into submitting personal information to… (More)
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Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
Definition of resilience Resilience (from the Latin etymology resilire, to rebound) is literally the act or action of springing… (More)
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Highly Cited
2005
Highly Cited
2005
Vulnerabilities that allow worms to hijack the control flow of each host that they spread to are typically discovered months… (More)
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Highly Cited
1993
Highly Cited
1993
Enhanced phytoplankton production and algal blooms, symptoms of eutrophication, are frequently caused by elevated nutrient… (More)
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