XDuce

XDuce ("tranceduce") is an XML transformation language.
Wikipedia

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2000-2013
024620002013

Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
2006
2006
This paper presents the core type system and type inference algorithm of OCamlDuce, a merger between OCaml and XDuce. The… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
Is this relevant?
2006
2006
We present an extension of XDuce, a programming language dedicated to the processing of XML documents, with polymorphism and… (More)
  • figure 3
  • figure 1
  • figure 4
  • figure 6
  • figure 7
Is this relevant?
2005
2005
Xtatic is an extension of C with native support for statically typed XML processing. It features XML trees as built-in values… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 3
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
Review
2003
Review
2003
XDuce is a statically typed programming language for XML processing. Its basic data values are XML documents, and its types (so… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
Regular expression types have been proposed as a foundation for statically typed processing of XML and similar forms of tree… (More)
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2003
Highly Cited
2003
The World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C) promotes XML and related standards, including XML Schema, XQuery, and XPath. This paper… (More)
Is this relevant?
2002
2002
We present re , a minimal functional calculus with regular expression types for strings, in order to establish a theoretical… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 4
  • figure 5
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2001
Highly Cited
2001
This document proposes an algebra for XML Query. The algebra has been submitted to the W3C XML Query Working Group. A novel… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
Is this relevant?
Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
Highly Cited
2000
This document proposes an algebra for XML Query. This work builds on long standing traditions in the database community. In… (More)
  • figure 1
  • figure 2
  • figure 3
  • figure 6
Is this relevant?