Wagner's theorem

In graph theory, Wagner's theorem is a mathematical forbidden graph characterization of planar graphs, named after Klaus Wagner, stating that a… (More)
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1973-2016
0119732016

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2016
2016
We introduce a notion of bipartite minors and prove a bipartite analog of Wagner’s theorem: a bipartite graph is planar if and… (More)
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2013
2013
In this paper, we give a perturbation proof to vector Gaussian one-help-one problem for characterizing the rate distortion region… (More)
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2012
2012
We start this article by recalling rigorous results previously obtained for 2d square lattices composed of (2N+1)<sup>2</sup… (More)
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2010
2010
In this part labelled I we rigorously examine 2D square lattices composed of (2N+1)<sup>2</sup> classical spins isotropically… (More)
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2010
2010
In this part labelled II we examine the spin correlations and the susceptibility. We use a similar method which has allowed to… (More)
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2009
2009
We give an extension to coincidence theory of some key ideas from Nielsen fixed point theory involving remnant properties of free… (More)
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2003
2003
Let G be an n-node planar graph. In a visibility representation of G, each node of G is represented by a horizontal line segment… (More)
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Highly Cited
1993
Highly Cited
1993
In 1943, Hadwiger made the conjecture that every loopless graph not contractible to the complete graph on t+1 vertices is t… (More)
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1991
1991
 
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1973
1973
Abstmct. Wagner’s theorem (any two maximal plane graphs having p vertices are equivalent under diagonal transformations) is… (More)
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