WDR34 gene

Known as: MGC20486, WDR34, FAP133 
 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

2007-2017
02420072017

Papers overview

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2018
2018
Tryptophan-aspartic acid (WD) repeat-containing protein 34 (WDR34), one of the WDR protein superfamilies with five WD40 domains… (More)
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2017
2017
The Wdr34 gene encodes an intermediate chain of cytoplasmic dynein 2, the motor for retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in… (More)
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2017
2017
OBJECTIVE Single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays and whole-exome sequencing (WES) are tools to precisely diagnose rare… (More)
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2015
2015
Short-rib thoracic dystrophies (SRTDs) are congenital disorders due to defects in primary cilium function. SRTDs are recessively… (More)
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2014
2014
Cytoplasmic dynein-2 is the motor for retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT), and mutations in dynein-2 are known to cause… (More)
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2014
2014
Initially identified in DNA damage repair, ATM-interactor (ATMIN) further functions as a transcriptional regulator of lung… (More)
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2013
2013
Bidirectional (anterograde and retrograde) motor-based intraflagellar transport (IFT) governs cargo transport and delivery… (More)
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2013
2013
Short-rib polydactyly (SRP) syndrome type III, or Verma-Naumoff syndrome, is an autosomal-recessive chondrodysplasia… (More)
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2013
2013
The correct formation of primary cilia is central to the development and function of nearly all cells and tissues. Cilia grow… (More)
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2007
2007
Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is the bi-directional movement of particles along the length of axonemal outer doublet… (More)
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