Vertex-transitive graph

Known as: Vertex transitive graph 
In the mathematical field of graph theory, a vertex-transitive graph is a graph G such that, given any two vertices v1 and v2 of G, there is some… (More)
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2019
2019
It is well-known that a complete Riemannian manifold M which is locally isometric to a symmetric space is covered by a symmetric… (More)
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2016
2016
An automorphism of a graph is said to be even/odd if it acts on the set of vertices as an even/odd permutation. In this article… (More)
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2014
2014
We consider the problem of computing identifying codes of graphs and its fractional relaxation. The ratio between the size of… (More)
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2013
2013
A core of a graph X is a vertex minimal subgraph to which X admits a homomorphism. Hahn and Tardif have shown that for vertex… (More)
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2013
2013
The theory of vertex-transitive graphs has developed in parallel with the theory of transitive permutation groups. In this… (More)
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2008
2008
The bondage number of a graph G is the minimum number of edges whose removal results in a graph with larger domination number. A… (More)
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Highly Cited
2006
Highly Cited
2006
The most promising class of statistical models for expressing structural properties of social networks observed at one moment in… (More)
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2004
2004
We consider the lossless compression of vertex transitive graphs. An undirected graph G = (V, E) is called vertex transitive if… (More)
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1994
1994
The Petersen graph on 10 vertices is the smallest example of a vertex-transitive graph which is not a Cayley graph. We consider… (More)
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Highly Cited
1991
Highly Cited
1991
Heuristic algorithms manipulating finite groups often work under the assumption that certain operations lead to “random” elements… (More)
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