Variola Minor

Known as: Alastrim, Minor, Variola, Minors, Variola 
A orthopoxvirus that causes a milder clinical syndrome than smallpox.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2014
2014
Despite increasing numbers of unaccompanied refugee minors (UM) in Europe and heightened concerns for this group, research on… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
Human disease likely attributable to variola virus (VARV), the etiologic agent of smallpox, has been reported in human… (More)
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2006
2006
This paper is concerned with stochastic models for the spread of an epidemic among a community of households, in which… (More)
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2000
2000
Alastrim variola minor virus, which causes mild smallpox, was first recognized in Florida and South America in the late 19th… (More)
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Highly Cited
1998
Highly Cited
1998
Sequencing and computer analysis of the left (52,283 bp) and right (49,649 bp) variable DNA regions of the cowpox virus strain… (More)
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Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
Smallpox was always present, filling the churchyard with corpses, tormenting with constant fear all whom it had not yet stricken… (More)
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1996
1996
To study specific properties of the human gamma-interferon (gamma-IFN) receptor-like proteins of the highly virulent and low… (More)
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1995
Highly Cited
1995
Rapid identification and differentiation of orthopoxviruses by PCR were achieved with primers based on genome sequences encoding… (More)
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1986
1986
Several groups of variola isolates were compared in DNA structure, and by four independent biologic markers. Isolates of variola… (More)
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1977
1977
Trend-surface analysis (TSA), a form of polynomial regression used in geology, ecology and geography, was applied to analysis of… (More)
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