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Turdus abyssinicus

Known as: Turdus olivaceus abyssinicus 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2019
2019
A total of thirty Austral thrushes Turdus falcklandii Quoy & Gaimard, 1824 (Turdidae) carcasses were brought to the Departamento… Expand
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2015
2015
Key messageBiomass equations are presented for five tree species growing in a natural forest in Ethiopia. Fitted models showed… Expand
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2013
2013
The leaves of Allophylus abyssinicus (Hochst.) Radlk. (Sapindaceae) are used for the treatment of wounds, burns, skin diseases… Expand
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2012
2012
Seasonal segregation among syntopic species can be viewed as one of the available strategies for coexistence, reducing… Expand
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Review
2009
Review
2009
The genus Nebrioporus Regimbart, 1906 is reviewed and partially revised. The historical subgeneric divisions have not been… Expand
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1990
1990
An acute hemorrhagic septicemia in a captive ground-hornbill (Bucorvus abyssinicus) is reported. Aeromonas hydrophila was… Expand
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1960
1960
Dr. J. M. Harrison has pointed out a misleading mistake in the list of British publications on wildfowl which appeared in the… Expand
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