Trust anchor

Known as: Root of Trust 
In cryptographic systems with hierarchical structure, a trust anchor is an authoritative entity for which trust is assumed and not derived. In X.509… (More)
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Papers overview

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Highly Cited
2017
Highly Cited
2017
Intel SGX, a new security capability in emerging CPUs, allows user-level application code to execute in hardwareisolated enclaves… (More)
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Highly Cited
2015
Highly Cited
2015
Embedded systems are at the core of many security-sensitive and safety-critical applications, including automotive, industrial… (More)
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2015
2015
Creating backdoors in integrated circuits (ICs), stealing hardware intellectual property, counterfeiting electronic components… (More)
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Highly Cited
2014
Highly Cited
2014
Security of a computer system has been traditionally related to the security of the software or the information being processed… (More)
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2013
2013
External hardware-based kernel integrity monitors have been proposed to mitigate kernel-level malwares. However, the existing… (More)
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Review
2010
Review
2010
This document describes a transport independent protocol for the management of trust anchors (TAs) and community identifiers… (More)
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Review
2010
Review
2010
This document describes how to use information associated with a trust anchor public key when validating certification paths… (More)
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2010
2010
Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) security depends upon secure management and usage of trust anchors. Unfortunately, widely used… (More)
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2009
2009
Security in browsers is based upon users trusting a set of root Certificate Authorities (called Trust Anchors) which they may… (More)
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Highly Cited
2007
Highly Cited
2007
In this paper we describe bugs and ways to attack trusted computing systems based on a static root of trust such as Microsoft’s… (More)
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