Thismia

 
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1999-2017
01219992017

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2017
2017
In general, plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi exchange photosynthetically fixed carbon for soil nutrients, but… (More)
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2016
2016
PREMISE OF THE STUDY Heterotrophic angiosperms tend to have reduced plastome sizes relative to those of their autotrophic… (More)
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2015
2015
A new species, Thismiahongkongensis S.S.Mar & R.M.K.Saunders, is described from Hong Kong. It is most closely related to… (More)
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2013
2013
Thismia singeri, is described for the first time for Brazil, being the first record of this family for Pará State and the third… (More)
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Review
2013
Review
2013
As usual, BRJB presents, in this issue, papers covering a wide diversity of topics in botany. There are two papers dealing with… (More)
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Review
2012
Review
2012
ROBERTS, N., WAPSTRA, M., DUNCAN, F., WOOLLEY, A., MORLEY, J. & FITZGERALD, N., 2003 (19.xii): Shedding some light on Thismia… (More)
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2012
2012
There is hardly a region in the world where mycoheterotrophy does not occur. As far as we know, all orchid species are dependent… (More)
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2006
2006
The mycoheterotrophic Burmanniaceae are one of the three families currently recognized in the order Dioscoreales. Phylogenetic… (More)
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1999
1999
A new species of Thismia (Thismiaceae) from Borneo is described. Thismia hexagona was discovered in 2013 in lowland mixed… (More)
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1999
1999
Thismia Griffith (1844: 221) usually grows among leaf litter in shady wet forests and comprises 47 small mycoheterotrophic… (More)
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