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TAS2R46 gene

Known as: T2R54, TAS2R46, T2R46 
 
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2018
2018
The number and variety of bitter compounds originating from plants are vast. Whereas some bitter chemicals are toxic and should… Expand
2018
2018
BACKGROUND In humans, bitterness perception is mediated by ~25 bitter taste receptors present in the oral cavity. Among these… Expand
2018
2018
Sensory studies showed the volatile fraction of lemon grass and its main constituent, the odor-active citronellal, to… Expand
2016
2016
Bitter taste is one of the five basic taste sensations which is mediated by 25 bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) in humans. The… Expand
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2015
2015
Most human G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are activated by small molecules binding to their 7-transmembrane (7-TM) helix… Expand
Review
2014
Review
2014
Bitter is the most complex of human tastes, and is arguably the most important. Aversion to bitter taste is important for… Expand
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2013
2013
Amino acids and peptides represent important flavor molecules eliciting various taste sensations. Here, we present a… Expand
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Highly Cited
2013
Highly Cited
2013
Solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs) are specialized cells in the respiratory epithelium that respond to noxious chemicals… Expand
2013
2013
The ability of cells to detect changes in the microenvironment is important in cell signaling and responsiveness to environmental… Expand
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Highly Cited
2013
Highly Cited
2013
Bitter taste is a basic taste modality, required to safeguard animals against consuming toxic substances. Bitter compounds are… Expand
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