Synthetic division

In algebra, synthetic division is a method of performing Euclidean division of polynomials, with less writing and fewer calculations than occur with… (More)
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1970-2014
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2011
2011
Let K be a field of characteristic zero, <i>x</i> - an independent variable, <i>E</i> - shift operator with respect to <i>x</i… (More)
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2010
2010
An analysis is given of the role of rounding errors in the synthetic division algorithm for computing the coefficients of the… (More)
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2005
2005
In the problem of estimating the angles of arrival to a uniform linear array, we present an efficient method to compute Maximum… (More)
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2003
2003
Horner’s method is a standard minimum arithmetic method for evaluating and deflating polynomials. It can also efficiently… (More)
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1999
1999
A simple numerical algorithm based on the generalized Inverse Vandermore matrix for evaluation of time response to a time… (More)
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1997
1997
We have developed an algorithm based on synthetic division for deriving the transfer function which cancels the tail of a given… (More)
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1996
1996
[ I ] D. E. Dudgeon and R. M. Mersereau, Multidimensional Digitul Signal Processing Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, 1984. [2… (More)
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1993
1993
  • Alan R Glasson
  • 1993
Synthetic division schemes to calculate the linear remainder when a polynomial is divided by a quadratic are used in numerical… (More)
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1972
1972
Prior to the new results reported here, the best algorithm for computing a polynomial and all its derivatives was the iterated… (More)
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1970
1970
It is shown that Clenshaw's method for evaluating finite series involving functions which satisfy a certain second-order… (More)
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