Structure of hyoglossus muscle

Known as: Hyoglossus, M. hyoglossus, Hyoglossus muscle 
A muscle extending from the hyoid bone to the side of the tongue that retracts and pulls the side of the tongue downward.
National Institutes of Health

Topic mentions per year

Topic mentions per year

1982-2016
024619822016

Papers overview

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2016
2016
The tongue is a highly muscular organ, and the extrinsic muscles of the tongue overlap one another, which makes their… (More)
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2014
2014
The pharyngeal muscles overlap each other and some of their parts have different areas of origin. Such arrangements make the… (More)
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2009
2009
The human tongue muscle hyoglossus (HG) is active in oromotor behaviors encompassing a wide range of tongue movement speeds. Here… (More)
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2009
2009
To investigate whether the two vowel classes of German are systematically produced with different muscular tension and could thus… (More)
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2005
2005
Postnatal development of hyoglossus and styloglossus motoneurons was studied in this investigation of the hypoglossal nucleus… (More)
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2005
2005
Zur Beobachtung gekommen im Januar 1877 an der linkan Seite eines arteriall injiairten Sch/idels eines Mannes. Die rechto hrteria… (More)
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2001
2001
A new technique, tagged Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging (tMRI), was used to develop a mechanical model that represented local… (More)
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1988
1988
The distribution of motoneurons innervating the extrinsic tongue muscles was studied in the dog, rabbit and rat using the… (More)
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1985
1985
As a step toward elucidating the tectal-controlling functions for generating the prey-catching motor pattern, electrically-evoked… (More)
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