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Structure of anal membrane

Known as: Anal Membrane 
The dorsal part of the cloacal membrane following its partition by the urorectal septum.
National Institutes of Health

Papers overview

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2014
2014
Anorectal malformations (ARM) are a complex, often combined type of pathology that requires deliberate differential approach to… Expand
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2007
2007
In the past, interpretations of anorectal development were mainly based on analysis of serially sectioned embryos of various… Expand
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2003
2003
Congenital anorectal abnormalities were diagnosed in three male and three female dogs. One dog had anal stenosis, three had a… Expand
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2000
2000
PURPOSE Traditional theories of cloacal embryogenesis assume that the urorectal septum fuses with the cloacal membrane before the… Expand
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1998
1998
Anorectal malformations (ARM) include a spectrum of anomalies which have been subdivided as "high", "intermediate" and "low"; a… Expand
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1990
1990
Twenty-eight pregnant rats (Wistar-Imamichi) on the 11th gestation day were treated with a single intragastric administration of… Expand
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1985
1985
  • T. E. James
  • South African medical journal = Suid-Afrikaanse…
  • 1985
  • Corpus ID: 41485714
A clinical observation of persistence of the circumferential part of the anal membrane, not infrequent in Xhosa babies, is… Expand
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1966
1966
SYNOPSIS An undamaged specimen of an imperforate anal membrane, including the rectum, anal canal and its sphincters became… Expand
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1964
1964
The current classification of congenital anorectal anomalies was established by Partridge and Gough, 1 who divided them into two… Expand
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1963
1963
My subject is congenital ano-rectal anomalies, commonly but inaccurately called imperforate anus, but in a short paper it would… Expand
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