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Stereoscopic acuity

Known as: Stereoacuity 
Stereoscopic acuity, also stereoacuity, is the smallest detectable depth difference that can be seen in binocular vision.
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Papers overview

Semantic Scholar uses AI to extract papers important to this topic.
Highly Cited
2014
Highly Cited
2014
We report on an experiment testing gaze-contingent depth-of-field (DOF) for the reduction of visual discomfort when viewing… Expand
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2014
2014
People experience a variety of 3D visual programs, such as 3D cinema, 3D TV and 3D games, making it necessary to deploy reliable… Expand
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Highly Cited
2011
Highly Cited
2011
We present a method to evaluate stereo camera depth accuracy in human centered applications. It enables the comparison between… Expand
Highly Cited
2008
Highly Cited
2008
Preface. Series Preface. Website and Exercises. List of Symbols. 1. Introduction. 1.1 Panoramas 1.2 Panoramic Paintings 1.3… Expand
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2006
2006
An experiment was performed which examined the proprioception accuracy of young (20–25 yrs) and elderly (70–80 yrs) subjects on… Expand
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Highly Cited
2002
Highly Cited
2002
An intensive care nursery provides health care for critically ill newborn infants. During a typical shift, infants range from… Expand
Highly Cited
1997
Highly Cited
1997
Purpose: Commercially available book-format random dot stereopsis tests for children are quick and simple to use, but provide… Expand
1984
1984
The malnutrition often associated with progressive renal failure may be related to a progressive deterioration of taste acuity… Expand
Highly Cited
1972
Highly Cited
1972
Vernier acuity was measured for vertical lines of different lengths; the threshold (about 4 sec of arc) was almost as good for… Expand
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